Introducing YippieMove '09. Easy email transfers. Now open for all destinations.
May
21.

As you probably have figured out by now, this blog is pretty much dead. We’ve had a lot of fun writing here, and we’ve received a lot of great coverage. For instance, we’ve been featured on Slashdot a few times along with a long list of other sites, such as Lifehacker.

That said, we don’t have much time anymore for blogging here at the moment, so we just wanted to write a note and let you guys know about that. Perhaps we will revive the blog in the future, but at the moment, we don’t have enough resources to allocate.

If you want to find out what we are up to, please visit WireLoad’s official website.

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Introducing YippieMove '09. Easy email transfers. Now open for all destinations.

It’s a good secure practice to force SSL on the the Admin back-end and the login-page in WordPress. I’m hardly the first one to point this out. There’s even an entire page over at WordPress’ website dedicated to this (Administration over SSL).

I’ve spent the last few days setting up WordPress as a CMS and webshop (with wp-e-commerce) for a company. While there are no credit cards involved in the webshop, I still wanted to secure the login and admin page. However, since the website is hosted at Dreamhost, I was limited to the .htaccess file. Moreover, since the .htaccess-file is the same for both SSL mode and non-SSL mode, I needed to use some kind of condition to avoid creating an infinite loop.

Enough rambling. The code snippets over at ‘Administration over SSL’ didn’t work, so I had to write one myself. Here it is:

RewriteCond %{HTTPS} !=on
RewriteRule ^(wp-admin.*|wp-login.*) https://www.yourdomain.com/$1
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =on
RewriteRule !^(wp-admin.*|wp-login.*) http://www.yourdomain.com/$1

Also, please note that this snippet must be after WP’s own redirection snippet, otherwise it won’t work. The entire .htaccess file looks as follow:


RewriteEngine On

## WordPress' SEO permlinks
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /index.php [L]

## Beefing up the security
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} !=on
RewriteRule ^(wp-admin.*|wp-login.*) https://www.yourdomain.com/$1
RewriteCond %{HTTPS} =on
RewriteRule !^(wp-admin.*|wp-login.*) http://www.yourdomain.com/$1

Update: This will actually not work very well as images for the back-end are not stored in any of the SSL folders. Hence the the server tries to serve the images without SSL while you are in SSL mode, which does not work very well.

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Introducing YippieMove '09. Easy email transfers. Now open for all destinations.
Jan
05.
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Category: Business

FML stories is one of those things that can only really thrive in the semi-anonymous world online. If you have never heard of the FML phenomenon yet, it’s a one or two sentence long story about how miserably the author’s life is or how they have managed to screw up.

I’ve been a fan of FML stories for a long time, as they are very entertaining to read. For quite some time I’ve received my daily dosage of FML stories from FMyLife, but with the raise of Twitter and countless competitors, it’s role became less important.

To resolve this problem, we created FML Ninja. With FML Ninja you can access FML stories from around the web in one place, as we aggregate stories from multiple sources (including FMyLife and Twitter). But we didn’t stop there. We also added a Digg-like voting system that allows our users to vote up their favorite top FML stories.

Ready to change the way you read your FML stories? Then check out FML Ninja now.

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Introducing YippieMove '09. Easy email transfers. Now open for all destinations.

Update: Please note that this does not apply to FreeBSD 8.x as POSIX Semaphores are now enabled by default. Hence you do not need to recompile the kernel.

Celery is a great product. Unfortunately getting it to work on FreeBSD is a bit of a hassle. After some troubleshooting we managed to get it running, here’s how we did it.

We are running FreeBSD 7.2, but this is likely to work on 7.x.

Step 1: Recompile kernel

I assume that you know how to compile the kernel on FreeBSD. If not, you can find out how to do it here. I also assume that you have the source code for FreeBSD installed.

Let’s head over to the code.
#cd /usr/src/sys/i386/conf

Make a copy of the standard kernel-config.
#cp GENERIC YOUR_KERNEL

Now we need to edit the kernel-config. You can obviously use any editor, but I prefer joe.
#joe YOUR_KERNEL

Change the ‘ident’ from GENERIC to YOUR_KERNEL
ident YOUR_KERNEL

This is the most important part. We need to add support for POSIX Semaphores. Add the following line:
options P1003_1B_SEMAPHORES # POSIX-style semaphores

That’s it for the kernel-config. Now just save the changes and exit (^K+X in joe).

Next up is the compiling and installing the actual kernel.
#cd /usr/src
#make buildkernel KERNCONF=YOUR_KERNEL
#make installkernel KERNCONF=YOUR_KERNEL
#reboot

That’s it. If everything went well, you should now have a kernel with POSIX Semaphores enabled.

Step 1: Install Python

I assume you got the ports installed, so here we go.

#cd /usr/ports/lang/python26
#make config

Make sure to select SEM and deselect PTH. If PTH is enabled, Celery won’t work.

If you’re running FreeBSD <7.2, you will need to edit Makefile and comment out the following:

Line 63-71:
#.if defined(WITH_SEM)
#.if ${OSVERSION} >= 701106
#SEM_MSG= ""
#.else
#IGNORE= POSIX semaphore support only works in FreeBSD 7-STABLE and later
#.endif # ${OSVERSION} >= 701106
#.else # !defined(WITH_SEM)
#SEM_MSG= "@comment "
.#endif # defined(WITH_SEM)

and line 186:
#.if ${OSVERSION} >= 701106

Next up, install Python:
#make clean install

Step 3: Test with simple app

With Python installed, let’s see if it actually works. To accomplish that, we will create a simple app.

Create a new file: test_mp.py

import multiprocessing as mp
p = mp.Pool(16)
import time
p.apply_async(time.sleep, 1)

Let’s run it:
#python test_mp.py

If the application silently exits within a second or so, you’re good to go. If not, please re-visit Step 1 and Step 2 to make sure you configured everything properly.

Step 4: Install Celery

This is probably the easiest step:
#easy_install celery

That’s it! Good luck!

Credits: Thanks asksol and raysl over at #celery.

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Introducing YippieMove '09. Easy email transfers. Now open for all destinations.

We have recently introduced news and articles over at Email Service Guide to complement the guide part itself. The theme is of course email in the form of reviews, analysis and how to’s. Here’re the current highlights:

We’ll definitely be adding to this list quickly in the coming week so make sure to check back often if you’re interested in the email space.

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